Spyderco K15 Itamae Petty Review

November 30, 2020

I know, buying a kitchen knife is not ‘cool’. Especially when you’re just starting out as a knifeknut, you got some big new folders to buy! However, which cutting chore do you perform the most in a day? If you’re a suburbanite like me, it’s a toss-up between opening mail and food prep. Sure, it’s great to test out that new folder in the kitchen, but it doesn’t compare to an actual high quality kitchen knife. The Spyderco Itamae series sure is the nicest expression of a kitchen knife I have encountered to date. And my most used design is the ‘small’ Petty.

When I first saw the Manix 2 sprint run in Burl G-10 I definitely did a double take. That swirling brown & black G10 looked amazing. Sadly for me, it came with a black coated handle, which is something I -personally- really don’t like. Luckily for me, the Spyderco design collaboration with Murray Carter includes that same amazing G10. It is only offered in the premium Itamae series, and not the Wakiita series that feature all-black G10 for its handles.

Super Blue
My first encounter with a Murray Carter knife was this Muteki neck knife I picked up in Switzerland a few summers ago. Amazing stuff, and very sharp! These Itamae kitchen knives also feature that amazing cutting edge of that neck knife. The blades feature a SUS410 and Super Blue steel. I’ve had  very good experiences with that same blade steel on the Delica sprint run from 2014. A fact I particularly noticed in the kitchen. Superblue does come with a ‘hungry edge’, it’s just a great steel for kitchen cutting in my limited experience.

The Spyderco K15 Itamae Petty developing its patina

Most used
I certainly don’t cook big amazing meals every day, my main kitchen duty is cleaning everything up again. I just like to help out my wife while she cooks with some of the slicing and dicing. And with what we cook on average, the Petty is more than large enough. The Santoku I have is great, but to be honest, the Petty is plenty big for about 90% of the slicing and dicing I do. I’ll admit I also have the Funayuki, but it doesn’t get as much use as the petty. Interestingly, I came across an older Spyderco catalog from 1986 or so, and it explicitly states that the smaller K05 is the ‘most used knife in the kitchen’. I should have read that sooner I guess.

An alternate view of the Spyderco K15 Itamae Petty developing its patina

Tiny laser
As a knifeknut it is a great experience working with a fine knife like the Petty. It’s like operating a tiny laser. And to see the patina change is just awesome. I’m not as well versed in kitchen cutlery, compared to EDC knives, but I understand that this Carter design is highly refined and appreciated by many experts. For example, the tip is designed in such a way that with repeated sharpening the tip will still be in the same spot relative to the cutting edge. How cool is that? I just can’t find a fault in the design and appreciate the ergonomics and blade design.

Maintenance
Sharpening SuperBlue is a breeze on my Sharpmaker. You can’t toss this knife in the dishwasher, and I recommend storing the knife in a kitchen block or in some type of blade-sleeve, to protect both the edge and your (family’s) fingers, when they reach in the drawer.

Give it a try
I know you all like the latest new folder designs way more than a simple kitchen knife. But give one a try, especially this Petty. You’ll like it a whole lot more than you think you do.

Check out the full specs of the Spyderco K15 Itamae Petty at www.spyderco.com.