Spyderco C242 Ikuchi Video

March 31, 2021

I shot this video to offer a better view of the very cool C242 Ikuchi folder. Check out my review to learn about my experiences with this folder.

Check out the SpydieWiki page for the C242 for more information on its specifications and production history.


Spyderco C242 Ikuchi Review

February 28, 2021

The C242 Ikuchi is unlike any other Spyderco folding knife. Not because it is a flipper, or even a front flipper (The C42 Viele was first in my opinion).  It is unique because it has such a narrow profile. The Ikuchi is also a fidget fan’s dream, but it is a true working pocketknife that also carries as easy a pocket lint.

The first generation of the Ikuchi was a disappointment to me. I read reviews from people complaining that the wheel was too tough to operate. This was not a problem in my sample. What was a serious problem, was the fact that this very sharp up-swept tip rode too high in the handle when closed. I’d poke my hand frequently when trying to pull the knife from my pocket or waistband. My CQI-ed sample of the Ikuchi solved this problem. I no longer get cut by the closed blade. The wheel does need a deliberate push/pull (depending on your technique) to operate, but it’s also very smooth.

The blade sits nicely below the edge of the handle in the CQI-ed verison of the Spyderco Ikuchi.

Blade
I’ll admit the fidget factor of the front-flipping Ikuchi is high, very high actually. To date, I haven’t been able to handle this folder without ‘spinning that wheel’ at least once. But the slender curvy blade works great too. It’s very easy to work that tip in the crease of the flap on an envelope, to   cleanly slice it open. Another advantage of such a narrow blade (compared to most spydies), is that it offers increased control for detailed cuts in an edge-in grip. Peeling fruit is a joy with this blade.

There is one disadvantage to a  slim blade like this. A narrow blade doesn’t offer a whole lot of ‘real estate’ for that full flat grind to come to a really thin edge. The blade on the C242 is by no means some kind of blunt chisel, on the contrary. But there are thinner blades and edges in Spyderco’s line-up.

S30V is a well-known entity. It cuts well and doesn’t rust in my suburban use. I barely developed a little dull spot on the edge, from breaking down a lot of thick cardboard boxes. It was child’s play to bring the edge back. Just a few swipes on the white stones of my Spyderco Sharpmaker was all that was needed.

Handle
The handle features a slight curve that really helps make it a very ergonomic folder to carry and use. I’m not a huge fan of the G10 & Carbon Fiber laminate, but it does offer a bit more grip than full carbon fiber. Don’t get me wrong, if this one is ever offered in a full carbon fiber version, I’ll go for it. But I will admit this laminate looks nicer than black G10 for this particular design.  A nice design touch is the hole in the handle. It lines up perfectly with the hole in the blade (which is there purely for trademark purposes).

Clip
The wire clip is the perfect complement to this thin classy folder. It almost makes it look like a pen in your pocket. As with all wire clips, there is a little flex or play when you move the clip from side-to-side. It’s inherent to the design and doesn’t affect the clip’s grip on your pocket or waistband. This side-to-side play is also the reason I am not a big fan of wire clips. However, I was happy that the clip was easy to switch to my preferred left-handed carry position.

Collectible
I usually stay away from labeling a particular knife as a real collectible or a good investment. Mainly because I feel that you should only buy a knife because you really like it. That way, you’ll never be disappointed. The C242 however, does offer a few unique features. The Ikuchi is perhaps the second design in Spyderco’s line-up to be designed as a one-hand opener without a functional opening hole. The C27 Jess Horn was made with a depression in the blade for one-hand opening. The Ikuchi has its serrated wheel for one-hand opening. The absence of a functional opening hole allows the blade to become a lot narrower. At least a lot narrower than most other spydies. I will admit the C27 Jess Horn, as well as his other designs, the Des Horn and most of Frank Centofante’s collaborations feature very slim blades as well. The C242, however, takes this slim profile and extends it all the way through it handle design. The combination of the front flipper wheel, extremely narrow profile and the absence of a functional opening hole, make the Ikuchi a really unique folder in Spyderco’s production history.  

Conclusion
Overall, the Ikuchi is a wonderful folder. I also think it’s remarkably versatile. If you’re a die-hard Spyderco collector, get one. The C242 only features a trademark hole in the blade, and has a slim and narrow profile that is rarely seen in Spyderco’s line-up.   If you mostly use your knives to fidget with, that serrated wheel on the C242 is just what you’re looking for. If you’re looking for a gentleman’s knife? The Ikuchi is a very stylish and low-key design that will ride nicely in your suit pocket. If you’re just looking for a practical EDC folder that’s both compact and full size at the same time, the C242 can fit that role really well too. I mostly like the Ikuchi because of that unique -to Spyderco- slim design. And that front flipper is just plain fun to fidget with.

Check out the SpydieWiki page for the C242 for more information on its specifications and production history.


Spyderco K15 Itamae Petty Review

November 30, 2020

I know, buying a kitchen knife is not ‘cool’. Especially when you’re just starting out as a knifeknut, you got some big new folders to buy! However, which cutting chore do you perform the most in a day? If you’re a suburbanite like me, it’s a toss-up between opening mail and food prep. Sure, it’s great to test out that new folder in the kitchen, but it doesn’t compare to an actual high quality kitchen knife. The Spyderco Itamae series sure is the nicest expression of a kitchen knife I have encountered to date. And my most used design is the ‘small’ Petty.

When I first saw the Manix 2 sprint run in Burl G-10 I definitely did a double take. That swirling brown & black G10 looked amazing. Sadly for me, it came with a black coated handle, which is something I -personally- really don’t like. Luckily for me, the Spyderco design collaboration with Murray Carter includes that same amazing G10. It is only offered in the premium Itamae series, and not the Wakiita series that feature all-black G10 for its handles.

Super Blue
My first encounter with a Murray Carter knife was this Muteki neck knife I picked up in Switzerland a few summers ago. Amazing stuff, and very sharp! These Itamae kitchen knives also feature that amazing cutting edge of that neck knife. The blades feature a SUS410 and Super Blue steel. I’ve had  very good experiences with that same blade steel on the Delica sprint run from 2014. A fact I particularly noticed in the kitchen. Superblue does come with a ‘hungry edge’, it’s just a great steel for kitchen cutting in my limited experience.

The Spyderco K15 Itamae Petty developing its patina

Most used
I certainly don’t cook big amazing meals every day, my main kitchen duty is cleaning everything up again. I just like to help out my wife while she cooks with some of the slicing and dicing. And with what we cook on average, the Petty is more than large enough. The Santoku I have is great, but to be honest, the Petty is plenty big for about 90% of the slicing and dicing I do. I’ll admit I also have the Funayuki, but it doesn’t get as much use as the petty. Interestingly, I came across an older Spyderco catalog from 1986 or so, and it explicitly states that the smaller K05 is the ‘most used knife in the kitchen’. I should have read that sooner I guess.

An alternate view of the Spyderco K15 Itamae Petty developing its patina

Tiny laser
As a knifeknut it is a great experience working with a fine knife like the Petty. It’s like operating a tiny laser. And to see the patina change is just awesome. I’m not as well versed in kitchen cutlery, compared to EDC knives, but I understand that this Carter design is highly refined and appreciated by many experts. For example, the tip is designed in such a way that with repeated sharpening the tip will still be in the same spot relative to the cutting edge. How cool is that? I just can’t find a fault in the design and appreciate the ergonomics and blade design.

Maintenance
Sharpening SuperBlue is a breeze on my Sharpmaker. You can’t toss this knife in the dishwasher, and I recommend storing the knife in a kitchen block or in some type of blade-sleeve, to protect both the edge and your (family’s) fingers, when they reach in the drawer.

Give it a try
I know you all like the latest new folder designs way more than a simple kitchen knife. But give one a try, especially this Petty. You’ll like it a whole lot more than you think you do.

Check out the full specs of the Spyderco K15 Itamae Petty at www.spyderco.com.


Spyderco C211 SpydieChef review

October 31, 2020

Marcin Slysz is an amazing knife maker. His knives are very functional, they work great, and they have a very clean look. After the very popular Techno and Bowie designs, many fans were eagerly anticipating the release of the C211 SpydieChef. I was one of them. I finally took this knife along on a recent camping trip as my only folder, so as to give it a proper workout. The SpydieChef works as good as it looks, but I think it needs a longer blade and serrations.

EDC
There is no doubt this is a really great everyday carry folder. I love the thin handle and the smooth titanium scales are great for IWB-carry. The blade shape and grind make the C211 an impressive slicer. And the positive blade to handle angle make for very ergonomic cutting; especially on a flat surface, like a cutting board. Using the SpydieChef to open packages, cut strings or break down cardboard boxes went as easy as you could imagine. The LC200N held up quite well. Even when the edge seemed to lose its shaving sharpness, it continued to cut very well. It was no challenge at all, to bring that sharp edge back again.

Folding kitchen knife
I’m not opposed to using a ‘folding kitchen knife’. For many years, my go-to kitchen cutlery for camping trips have been a serrated Police 3 and an XL Lum Chinese Folder. I’m also no snob worried about ‘rust’ on these knives. I just use them, and wash them afterwards with water and soap and dry them off. When I come home, I briefly check the inside of the handle and pivot and apply some oil. I haven’t had any problem with dirt or corrosion in these knives for the past 10 years.

Kitchen performance
Now, onto the chore the SpydieChef was designed for: food prep. The ergonomics were designed to excel in cutting on a board. And the entire knife is almost rustproof, with its Titanium handle and LC200N steel. The SpydieChef certainly slices and dices with the best of my regular small kitchen knives.  However, with its 3.5 inch blade, it is a bit on the short side. Sure I use smaller folders for food prep all the time, in a pinch or for testing. But for a purpose-driven design like this, I’d like to see it with a larger 4 inch blade. This way, it would still also work for EDC.

Serrations
Apart from another half inch of blade, I -really- missed serrations. Cutting fresh bread and rolls in the morning was an embarrassment. The C211 just couldn’t ‘grip’ into the crust while slicing. Sure, I could ‘stab’ the bread and then cut my way into a slice. But that doesn’t even come close to the fine job my serrated Police 3 usually does on trips like these.

Overall
The C211 SpydieChef is an awesome folder, no doubt. It’s a great everyday carry utility folder with a few added features. You can take this folder into the water without any worries. In that respect it’s nice to have a more ‘classier’ knife option for EDC as opposed to the FRN H1 Salt series. In addition, the C211 is a very nice folding paring knife. In my book, it’s not the definitive folding kitchen knife. For that role, I’ll stick to my trusty serrated Police 3 and (plain edge) Lum Chinese folder XL. The latter is –to me- nicer to use despite the less ergonomic blade/handle angle, because of its wider and longer blade.

Check out the specs and history of the C211 SpydieChef at SpydieWiki.com.