Spyderco C81 Paramilitary 2 SPY27 sprint run

July 31, 2022

I know I’m a sucker for colored folding knives and sprint runs, but this one was, yes, how to put it …. It is -a lot- No scratch that, this one is just too much. And that it why I think it’s amazing. From the Colorado flag dyed onto the G10 handle, all the way to the multi-color engraved flag on the blade. It’s a unique piece for sure, and it has gotten plenty of criticism online. I’m also sure that given a few years, this will be very collectible. That’s just how it goes with all the ‘outrageous’ looking spydies.


C223 Para 3 Lightweight SPY27 Review

June 30, 2022

Perhaps it’s because one of my first Spyderco folders was a Delica 3 lightweight with a blue handle, but really like this Para 3 Lightweight in SPY27. It’s incredibly light, an impressive cutter and easy to bring back like new again. SPY27 is still new to me and so far, I like it a lot.

Blade

The Para 3’s blade is almost 3 inches long, almost as long as my beloved Delica folders. However, the C223 sports a significantly wider blade than a FFG Delica. This would give the Para 3 a lot more cutting power. Now, this is not something I could quantify, but I do notice the C223 slicing through a box a bit smoother than a C11. It’s also easier to settle in my knuckles against the wider blade of the C223 when it’s pressed into service as a paring knife in the kitchen. And yes, I enjoy to help out cooking once in a while, with my cleaned folding knife. It’s fun and it helps to test a design. My preferred blade length is 3,5 inches for a utility folding knife. The C223’s blade does everything  great, it just comes up a bit short when it comes to food prep. The Para 3 is great for allround everyday cutting chores though, just not ‘perfect’ (at least for me). The SPY27’s edge came from the box nice and ‘sticky sharp’, as Sal likes to put it.  Its edge-holding appeared to be better than VG10, which is one of my favorite steels.  The main thing I like is that SPY27 is stainless, I just love a clean looking blade, or a blade that can be cleaned up again. And I’m never far away from a Sharpmaker to touch up the edge. And SPY27 is very easy to bring back. Just how I like it.

Handle

The Para 3’s FRN’s handle is nicely rounded compared to its G10 version. One thing most people forget about these lil’ big knives, is that they’re basically ‘chopped’ versions of the  – in this case – full size Military or Paramilitary. That short but wide blade offers excellent slicing, but it’s pretty wide compared to most other 3 inch blades. Same goes for the handle, it might be on the short side, but it’s wide. The wider blade of the Para 3 also means it needs a wider handle, compared to the C11 Delica. And here is where it adds more benefits. The wider handle fits my hand better. I do  use the choil for a full grip on the C223, but it is the kind of grip where I can’t or just barely touch the palm of my hand with the tips of my fingers. So I can really grab that knife. However, the wider than usual handle (and blade) for such a compact folding knife, means that it does take up some real estate in a pocket or waistband, especially compared to a Delica for example.

Clip

The wire clip is very nice, it allows the C223 to ride nice and low in a pocket. And the round wire make it very ergonomic in use. Sometimes, I have trouble switching the clip, the screw won’t come out. I actually rotated one screw assembly through the handle material, screwing up the knife. The good people at the SFO set me straight. Make sure you put the knife down on a surface below the waist. That way you approach the screw with your torx driver in a good linear angle straight down. It works like a charm. Even after 25 years of collecting Spyderco knives, there’s always something new to learn.

Overall

The lightweight Para 3 is an excellent lightweight folder. Just like the lightweight Manix, you get so much blade for such little weight. I clip these on my shorts each summer. The SPY27 is a very nice steel, excellent for the user and collector who has access to a Sharpmaker. And the blue handle makes it a very nostalgic callback to the blue lightweight Delica that was I think the second or third Spyderco in my collection.

See more details of the Spyderco C223 Para 3 lightweight on SpydieWiki, or read my earlier review of the DLT Trading C223 Lightweight exclusive in M390. More information on SPY27 can be found in this article at knifesteelnerds.com.


Another Spyderco Visit

May 31, 2022

I’ve been lucky enough over the years to have visited the Spydercrew in their natural habitat, i.e. the Spyderco HQ in Golden. Since the start of the pandemic, I haven’t had a chance to see the crew at all, since most shows were cancelled.  Luckily, the pandemic is waning and we got to travel across the pond again. Our first destination: Golden, Colorado, U.S.A, Earth.

Meeting the people who make my favorite knives is always a treat. It’s a lot of fun to connect with the people. Meeting and talking with everyone also provides a deeper understanding in the work each crew member performs, to bring those cool designs to life. Even if you’ve been around these knives for a number of years, like myself, there is always something new to learn. If you get a chance to meet the Spydercrew at the SFO, a show or meet, do take that chance. They love talking knives and you’ll learn so much more than just from your IG feed.

For example, it was pointed out to me that for unscrewing those single-sided clip-screws in the FRN handle of the Lightweight Para 3, it is important to lay the knife down on a table top and to exert enough downward pressure. A screw that didn’t want to come loose, now did come loose. As I said, there’s always something new to learn. 

More importantly, it was good to reconnect with my ‘tribe’ again. My daughters have crawled around the SFO before as toddlers, and now they share their experiences in fluent English, of the trip and school and friends back home. Luckily for Mom, their interest in the candy drawer upstairs proved a lot stronger than the knives at the SFO downstairs. 😉 


Spyderco C196 Mamba Video

April 20, 2022

Probably one of Spyderco’s best looking and most impractical folding knife designs, the C196 Mamba. This is a design collaboration with knife designer Joel Pirela and knifemaker Walter Brend. It looks amazing and it handles wonderfully. However, it is very thick and the corners are sharp. It’s far from comfortable to carry if you’re a suburbanite like me. And if you’d start using this knife for EDC, that beautiful TiCn coating will scratch and wear. Still, the Mamba is an amazing knife that I love having in my collection!

See more details of the Spyderco C196 Mamba on SpydieWiki, or read my review. I also shot photos and video of the original production prototype at the 2016 Amsterdam Meet.


Favorite features: Spyderco grinds

March 31, 2022

I’ve been using and collecting Spyderco knives for over 20 years. And I have settled on a few design features that I particularly like, and some that I dislike. Here’s a rundown of my favorite grinds that I encountered in Spyderco knives so far.

Hollow grind
My very first Spyderco knives were the lightweight C11 Delica and C41 Native. At the time, they were made using a hollow ground blade. I love the cutting performance of these great pocket knives. I’m sure there was more to the cutting performance than just the grind, such as the relatively thin blade, steel, blade shape and ergonomics, but it sure didn’t hurt. If the blade isn’t too thick or when the blade is wide enough to allow for a nice gradual hollow grind, I don’t mind this type of grind at all.

Review: Rocksalt

Sabre grind
In my opinion, this is a hollow grind gone wrong. I get that for some knife users the hollow grind leaves you with a relatively weaker edge and tip, and applying a flat grind in the place of a hollow grind fixes that. However, a hollow/sabre grind only goes up to about the centerline of the blade. This is very little room for the grind to run from a sharp edge to the full thickness of the blade. Where a good hollow grind can still provide a nice slicing blade, a sabre grind blade is -to me- like cutting with a chisel. I’ve encountered this grind in the Delica & Endura 4 designs. Which I vastly prefer in their full flat ground variations.

Review: Rescue jr. SE

Full flat grind
This is the grind that became all the rage online, when I first logged onto a knife discussion forum over 20 years ago. The Spyderco Moran and the Military were the first major designs at the time that helped celebrate the gospel of the ‘FFG’. My personal experience with this grind started with the Calypso jr. lightweight, an amazing pocket knife that I still enjoy carrying from time to time. After that, I cut my proverbial teeth on the full flat grind with my Military. This grind, as done by Spyderco at least, offers that excellent extremely fine slicing experience. If you want to impress someone with a sharp knife, let them cut something with your full flat grind. A nice added bonus of this grind, is that it can also be part of a stronger thicker blade design, while still maintaining good cutting performance. A good example would be the Lil’ Temperance design. The full flat grind has become a mainstay and dominant grind in Spyderco’s line-up. You can’t miss it. Spyderco’s most popular knife these days appears to be the Paramilitary 2, and not surprisingly, it features a full flat grind.

Review: Spyderco C230G Lil’ Native

Overall
Naturally, each grind has its place and tasks where it excels. As a suburbanite, I prefer thin edges and smooth cutting when I open a package, envelope or piece of fruit. That is why I prefer a nice full flat grind. However, were I to rely on my folding knife to perform hacking and prying tasks all day, then I’d probably prefer a sabre grind. However, as things are now, I like my grinds smooth and slicey.

What are your favorite grinds? Feel free to leave a comment.


Video: Ed Schempp Custom Bowie

February 20, 2022

About 5 years ago, I received this custom version of the Spyderco C190 Schempp Bowie.  I posted photos and my review of it a few years back. This time, I’m just shamelessly showing it off in this close-up video. I still carry and use the knife, but with care. I don’t baby it, but I certainly won’t go out of my way to see when it would break.

I think I encountered the original concept models for this amazing knife around 2013. Back then, Spyderco was showing 3 sizes of this ethnic American design. I still think they should have gone with the XL-version. The production prototype they did choose was the ‘medium size’. It’s definitely more practical. The design impressed me so much, and Ed is an amazing person and knife-maker, I had to try and get a custom version from him. I wanted a true custom, tailored to my preference. This model is pretty close to the original concept model. Except for the Mokume bolster, lightning strike carbon fiber handle scales, CPM-S90V/CPM-154 cladded blade, wireclip and oh yeah, it’s left-handed. To make it even more personal, Ed engraved my name on the inside of the handle. Well, I guess that’s also a way to stop me from being able to sell it on Ebay. 😉

See more details of the Spyderco C190 Schempp Bowie on SpydieWiki. Or see my first post about this custom knife. You can also see the original production prototype from the Amsterdam Meet in 2014, or the video I shot at the 2014 IWA Show.


A second look at the Spyderco C241 Kapara

January 27, 2022

My favorite Spyderco general utility folder is the Stretch. So when I first encountered the Kapara prototype, it can’t be a big surprise that I liked what I saw. Handling the prototype quickly sealed the deal; it’s a must-have. What made it even better, was that I met the Kapara’s designer, Alistair Phillips, at the 2018 Amsterdam Meet, and he is really great guy. The older I get, I find that I simply like my knife designs a lot better, if the designer is a good guy as well. The Kapara does not disappoint. Especially this DLT Trading exclusive edition of the C241.

The Kapara’s 3.5 inch blade hits my personal sweet spot for a folding knife length. Sure, I can make do with shorter blades or longer edges. But a 3.5 inch blade just feels right for me. What the Kapara does better than the Stretch, is the slightly larger negative blade angle. This translates into a more ergonomic cutting design. The C241 also features a 3D rounded handle that is more ergonomic to grip than the Stretch with its flat handle slabs. Compared to the carbon fiber handle of the production Kapara, this gray G10 handle subjectively feels a bit more solid and ever so slightly more ‘tactile’. I wouldn’t go as a far as calling it grippy, as both handles are smooth. The overall ergonomics of the handle is what makes sure it stays on your hand.

Cutting

The inspiration for the Kapara’s design was to create a folding picnic knife, or food prep knife. I think it is a very different design than the SpydieChef though. The Kapara doesn’t try to be a rust proof hard working folding kitchen knife, but rather a really nice folder that works great at lunchtime. And the CPM20CV performs great. I didn’t push it so far that it actually ‘needed’ sharpening. Subjectively, again, it 20CV feels like cutting with Super Blue steel. This DLT exclusive Kapara also has that ‘hungry edge’ I encountered in my Super Blue Delica. It has a very keen edge that just seems to cut a little more aggressively into sandwiches, apples and tomatoes, as well as packages and other cardboard boxes.

Overall

If you’re looking for a classy folder that is a high performance slicer, practical for food prep and that could also pass for a gentleman’s folder, the Kapara is it. And what I find equally important, the maker is a really great guy! If you can find this exclusive edition of the Kapara, I can heartily recommend it, you won’t regret is – either as a user or a collectible.

Check out specs on the C241 Kapara at the Spyderco website, Spydiewiki for more background information, or my review of the production Kapara. Also check out Alistair Phillips’ website to see more of his amazing work.


The Spyderco C64 Meerkat: a boomerang Spydie

December 19, 2021

The Spyderco C64 Meerkat was originally produced from 2002 until 2004. A respectable run for a Spyderco design, but it’s nowhere near as impressive as such mainstays as the Delica, Military or Paramilitary 2. There have been, however, 4 revivals of this wonderful little big knife. One of these, is this version with a burnt-orange FRN handle and HAP40/SUS410 blade. If you’d ask me, I wouldn’t say that the Meerkat is one of my ‘favorites’, but somehow it does seem to find its way into my pocket regularly.

Let’s start with my main ‘objections’ to the Meerkat: it’s thick and it’s a tip-down carry only. That means it’s slightly more uncomfortable to carry and a little more awkward for me to deploy. But that’s about it. Features of the C64 I do like, are the lefty clip mounting option, the ergonomic 3D sculpted handle, the blade width and excellent edge geometry.

Phantom Lock

Operating the Meerkat left-handed is not easy. The phantom lock is definitely biased for right-handers. However, there’s no mechanism that cannot be learned by opening and closing it constantly when watching TV, right? My wife and kids are not always happy with this ‘training’, as the click clacking tends to ruin certain moments in movies, or so I’ve been told. 😉

Blade

On paper, the C64 is a rather small folder. In reality, the Meerkat’s blade is short – not small. The blade’s width gives the knife very impressive cutting ability. The edge is really thin, and the HAP40 makes it a very smooth cutter. So much so, that I’m not afraid to admit that I cut myself a few times. Playing with that phantom lock might have something to with it as well.

Handle

The handle features these divots all over the handle that might look a bit odd at first. Once you grip the knife, you immediately know what these ‘holes’ are for. That provide a positive full handed grip on a pretty short knife.

Lil’ Big Knife

The Meerkat is one of the earlier ‘lil’ big knife’ designs from Spyderco. It came from the ‘Experimental’ and Navigator designs. In regular production, the Meerkat lasted two years. This is a respectable production time, but not too long. I think it’s funny to see no less than 4 sprints of the C64 since its original production ended in 2003. And like that production history, the Meerkat also keeps on finding its way back in my carry rotation. In that respect it’s really the ‘boomerang design’ of my Spyderco collection. It just keeps coming back.

See more details of the Spyderco C64 Meerkat on Spydiewiki.com, or check out my previous articles, such as: an earlier review, my Meerkat countertop display, photos of the prototype of the knife featured in this article, or my impressions of the burgundy and blue sprint run Meerkats.


Spyderco C101 Manix 2 Video

July 14, 2021

The black & purple combo on this DLT Trading exclusive C101 Manix 2 still mesmerizes me. It’s fun to photograph, or to put on video. Check out my earlier article on this incredible folder.


Favorite Features: Spyderco Pocket Clips

June 2, 2021

This is my second ‘two cents’ of things I like in my Spyderco knives. For this entry, I’d like to share my preferences in pocket clips.  According to the Interwebz, wireclips are really popular and you should always seek out a custom clip for your Spyderco knife ;-). While I totally get the fun in customizing your knife, I prefer to use stock clips. Spyderco invented the pocket clip on a folding knife, and has made it into an art form. They also learned many lessons about clips in their 40+ years of design and manufacturing experience. Here’s a rundown of the types of Spyderco clips I like.

My main mode of carrying a Spyderco folding knife, is inside-the-waistband at 3 and 9 o’ clock. Your experience and preference might very well differ from mine, especially if you carry a clipit in your front or back pocket, inside a boot or on the lapel of your shirt (yes, I’ve seen people do this very successfully). Here’s just my personal take on pocket clips.

4-way hourglass clip: the evolved ‘standard’ solid pocket clip, found in the Delica and Endura and many more. If given the choice, and if it matches cosmetically with the color scheme of the folder, go with the ‘all stainless’ version, as the black will wear from your clip. I really like this type of clip, it works, is comfortable in the hand and very durable.

Foldover wireclip: a wonderful low-profile carry solution, found on the UK Penknife, Urban and SpydieChef. This type of clip makes the folder almost completely disappear from sight, and they very comfortable in the hand. However, a knife that’s this deeply tucked away is also harder to pull from your pocket or waistband, since you often pinch-grip the clip and opposite handle scale to draw your knife. This pressure on the clip makes it harder to get the knife out. More importantly, and why I don’t particularly like this type of clip, is that there’s always a bit of side to side play that annoys me. I don’t dismiss a folder on the basis of the wireclip alone, but it’s not a plus to me.

Wireclip: this is an older variant of the wireclip, found on the Dodo and lightweight Manixes. I love this type of wireclip. It leaves a bit of handle for an easy draw, the round wire is comfy in the hand and they are solid. No side to side play in these wireclips.

Custom clips: some Spyderco custom collaborations feature custom clips. A clip designed to fit the knife. Now these may look good cosmetically, but often they just don’t work right for me. They’re either too small, or sharp to the touch, or don’t clip the knife to your pocket as good as a standard issue hourglass clip.

Three screw old school clips: found on vintage knives and new sprint runs, like the Calypso jr. They work great, they’re not as ergonomic to the touch as an hourglass clip though.

Barrel bolt clips: found on many lightweight folders such as the Gen 2 Delica or Gen 1,2 and 3 Native, as well as the Gen 1 Matriarch. Performance-wise they’re the same to me a three screw old school clips. I did appreciate how easy it was to change the clip for lefty-carry with just two coins.

Lil’ Temp 1 and 2 clip: found on the … Lil’ Temperance 1 and 2 folders and the original ATR. These clips received some criticism online at the time, for being too large and that they could damage your pocket. I never had any issues with these clips tearing up my jeans though. And I really like the feel of these clips in hand. I also never had a problem with the clips’ size, due to my preferred IWB carry mode. Another reason I like this clip design, is that it uses 4 screws to keep it in place instead of 3. I snagged my clip one time and it was bent horribly out of alignment with the handle. The clip was still solidly stuck to the handle though, and I could carefully bend it back and it still works fine today.

Integral FRN clip: found on the lightweight Dragonfly 1. I don’t like this design at all as I never found a sample that actually clipped to my pocket or waistband with any proper tension. The ergos in use are great though. You’re not likely to find a Spydie with and integral FRN clip anymore, as Spyderco abandoned this design many years ago. Apparently, the main problem was that many people broke them too easily.

Kraton covered clips: found in some vintage Spyderco folders like the Hunter and Civilian. This would give the user a more solid non-slip grip when deploying the knife and a more comfortable non-slip grip in use. I’ve seen them wear and come off as they’re basically glued into the clip. The concept however, can also be replicated with some skateboard tape. I did this way back when I was into the whole ‘tactical’ thing. It worked really well and they could be easily replaced. The bad thing is that, well, this abrasive tape works really well at being abrasive. It would scratch up my belt and wear on pockets, and table tops when I slid the knife over etc…